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Archive for February, 2009

Sheriff’s officer injured in crash with teen driver

Friday, February 6th, 2009

A crash involving an unmarked New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office vehicle tied up traffic for about an hour Friday afternoon.The wreck happened around 3:30 p.m. at the busy intersection of Gordon and North College roads.

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Cape Fear Pride makes it to Port City and honors Black History Month

Friday, February 6th, 2009

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Local historians say much of the credit for building the majestic places that make up historic downtown Wilmington goes to many enslaved and free African-Americans.

Beverly Tetterton, a New Hanover County librarian said, “Architectural historians will tell you Wilmington was built by slaves. They were in all of the construction trades; not just buildings but also boats, vessels, any kind of building was performed by free African-Americans and slaves.”

Prior to the civil war, Wilmington was the largest city in North Carolina. A southern town in that era with booming construction, a port, and a railroad system required skilled African-American labor.

Much of this history is kept alive by dedicated people like librarian Beverly Tetterton who has spent hours upon hours cataloging many of Wilmington’s historic homes including the Bellamy Mansion, which was built for a wealthy planter before the Civil War in 1859 by slaves and free black artisans. Now the home serves as a museum.

“The history here is so deep and so rich and broad that it really is intriguing,” said Beverly Ayscue the Bellamy Mansion executive director. “We certainly hope that by having the Bellamy Mansion here and other historical homes in town; that’s the reason we save them so we will have physical examples from our past.”

Slaves who were leased out for labor built historical centerpieces like Thalian Hall. The money owed would be paid to their masters.

Tony Rivenbark, Thalian Hall executive director, said, “Slave labor were basically the skilled masons and plasterers in Wilmington. So many of Wilmington’s buildings private and public before the civil war were built by these artisans.”

And what magnificent work they did.

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videoLocal historians say much of the credit for building the majestic places that make up historic downtown Wilmington goes to many enslaved and free African-Americans.

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Associated poll

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Five Wilmington clients make the Madoff list

Friday, February 6th, 2009

The list of clients that Bernard Madoff allegedly bilked out of $50 billion includes five from Wilmington – three of them connected with the same family.

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Resident, pet snake escape fire at Campus Edge apartment

Friday, February 6th, 2009

When Danny Williams woke to find his Wilmington apartment on fire, the first thing he saved was Bo, his pet boa constrictor.“He was the first thing I grabbed, because it’s a life. My livelihood is my guitar, then my TV, but other than that, I lost everything,” Williams said.

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Red Dress Luncheon raises money for heart disease

Friday, February 6th, 2009

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It was a sea of red today at the Landfall Country Club. The ladies were dressed up for the annual Red Dress Luncheon to raise money for heart disease. Heart disease is the number one cause of death among women.

Donations help fund awareness pamphlets and cholesterol screenings through New Hanover Regional Medical Center’s Coastal Care Van, which travels across the county to perform cholesterol tests to help prevent the disease.

Tracey Kellogg of New Hanover County Medical Center Foundation said, “So much of this can be prevented by making heart healthy choices. That’s what our outreach program is all about, is to help women be educated about one their own risks.”

Of those screened on the Coastal Care Van in New Hanover County last year, nearly 200 women were flagged as at risk for heart disease.

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It was a sea of red today at the Landfall Country Club. The ladies were dressed up for the annual Red Dress Luncheon to raise money for heart disease.

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Associated poll

More: continued here

 

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