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Archive for May, 2009

Shelters struggling to serve homeless people with mental illnesses

Thursday, May 28th, 2009

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Mental illness and homelessness are often linked together. It often starts when individuals or families lose everything, and get depressed and shelters are now having a hard time keeping up with the number of homeless folks with mental illnesses.

The mental health system in our state has been suffering for quite some time now.

According to officials at Good Shepherd Ministries, less funding for mental health will inevitably create more homelessness in our area.

“Even for our homeless families, if a month ago they were housed, and their children had a dog, toys, and books of their own, and today their living in a shelter, and each of them have been reduced to about two suitcases worth of belongings, there are no toys, no dog, that would be cause to at least be clinically depressed,” said Katrina Knight of Good Shepherd.

Katrina Knight sees first hand the link between mental illness and homelessness. Problem is, shelters like Good Shepherd don’t have the resources to clinically treat patients with mental illnesses.

“There aren’t a lot of mental health professionals out there who are looking for business from the population we are working with,” Knight said.

Good Shepherd used to have three full time staff members from Southeastern Center to work with anyone with mental illness, but after the mental health reform, and many financial cut backs by the state, those staff members are no longer there.

The state reform in 2008 was aimed at treating people with mental illness through providers, as opposed to in one of the state’s four psychiatric hospitals. Then the state had some financial problems, and was forced to cut back their providers.

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videoMental illness and homelessness are often linked together. It often starts when individuals or families lose everything, and get depressed and shelters are now having a hard time keeping up with the number of homeless folks with mental illnesses.

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Associated poll

More: continued here

Preservation of Gullah-Geechee culture

Thursday, May 28th, 2009

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The Gullah-Geechee Heritage Commission scheduled a public forum Thursday evening to discuss the preservation of our area’s Gullah-Geechee culture.

The culture originated from slaves who were brought to our coast from West Africa.

“There are probably pockets of preservation that various different groups are individuals may be preserving as part of their daily lives and that’s what they are trying to discover with this meeting tonight,” said Cape Fear Museum Director Ruth Hass.

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The Gullah-Geechee Heritage Commission scheduled a public forum Thursday evening to discuss the preservation of our area’s Gullah-Geechee culture.

The culture originated from slaves who were brought to our coast from West Africa.

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Associated poll

More: continued here

Hanover Center welcomes move of Kingoff’s Jewelers

Thursday, May 28th, 2009

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Since 1919, Kingoff’s and its clock have been downtown landmarks. “Well, I’m sad that we’re leaving downtown. We love downtown and look forward to their 2020 vision and being a beautiful place to shop,” said Janice Kingoff.

Kingoff’s Jewelers has been a downtown destination for 90 years and three generations… Ben, Bill, and Michael.

The family theme extends to its employees. “I was raised by the people who worked here and the people who were clients here,” said second-generation employee Zaharoula Katsikis.

But the family jewelers will soon be on the move over to Hanover Center. “Some people are delighted and can’t wait to shop with us at Hanover Center and some people are devastated,” Janice said.

At the Hanover Center, both the new neighbors and mall operators are rolling out the welcome mat.

“It’s just a perfect match for us. We’ve wanted a really good jewelry store in here for a while,” said Bruce Henderson of Hanover Center.

“Obviously we don’t want any empty space around us, so hopefully it’s going to generate a lot of traffic for us and we can actually help one another,” said Kim Harts of SAS Shoes.

While Kingoff employees are sad about leaving downtown, they’re looking forward to the move. “It’s been nice being here, but I am really excited also about our new store,” Koula Katsikis said.

Many customers were concerned about the fate of the recently replaced Kingoff clock on Front Street. It too will be on the move, not to the hanover center, though. The Kingoff’s will display it proudly outside their store in The Forum shopping center.

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videoSince 1919, Kingoff’s and its clock have been downtown landmarks. “Well, I’m sad that we’re leaving downtown. We love downtown and look forward to their 2020 vision and being a beautiful place to shop,” said Janice Kingoff.

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Associated poll

More: continued here

Miss USA visits children in Wilmington

Thursday, May 28th, 2009

Meeting with the media was the second stop on Kristen Dalton’s itinerary after visiting and talking with students at the Snipes Academy of Arts and Design.

More: continued here

Topsail High students plug into auto world

Thursday, May 28th, 2009

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Here’s a math problem for you: Take eight Topsail High students, add two cars, thirteen batteries and then subtract gasoline…What do you get? Nine national trophies.

“It’s really cool…it’s really cool. It’s awesome,” said Topsail senior Quenton McCloud.

The students recently took their crafted cars to Raleigh for an electric car competition.

It took the students three months to strip a Toyota MR2 and convert her to electricity. It’s all part of a class called Electric Car.

“I feel very privileged to be part of this program,” said senior Robert Ward.

After six to eight hours of charge, in any household outlet, their car is ready to hit the open road, maxing out at 60 miles an hour.

The boys all understand they’re on the cutting edge of clean air technology, creating something that could be the wave of the future.

“It’s a good way to change the world, change the environment. We’re only one a few schools to have it,” said junior Brady Greathouse.

This isn’t the first year the Topsail High electric car has taken home trophies, they’ve placed six years in a row.

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videoHere’s a math problem for you: Take eight Topsail High students, add two cars, thirteen batteries and then subtract gasoline…What do you get? Nine national trophies.

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Associated poll

More: continued here

 

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