Wilmington HotelsWilmington AdvertiseWilmington AttractionsWilmington BeachesWilmington Business DirectoryWilmingtonWilmingtonWilmington GolfWilmington JobsWilmington NewsWilmington DiningWilmington Weather
     

 

 

Wilmington, NC News

  Free Wilmington Travel Guide!

Archive for September, 2009

Navassa officials feeling bypassed by road-building schedule

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

By Patrick GannonPatrick.Gannon@StarNewsOnline.com

As the N.C. Department of Transportation begins its search for companies to design and build the southernmost stretch of the U.S. 17 Wilmington Bypass in Brunswick County, officials in a small town are questioning why the other section isn’t being built first.

More: continued here

Wilmington drivers should start seeing more green

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

Body

If you drive around Wilmington, you often find yourself waiting….and waiting….and waiting….at red lights. The city’s traffic lights are notoriously long, but that will soon change.

The city is upgrading the traffic signal system at more than 200 intersections. Wednesday, crews worked at Independence and Shipyard.

“We can’t build that many more roads in the city of Wilmington or even in the county of New Hanover. This will give us a very efficient way to move traffic through our community,” said Mayor Bill Saffo.

The old and new equipment looks fairly similar. City Traffic Engineer Don Bennett compares it to buying a new computer. “You go buy a PC today and then go buy a PC from 20 years ago and the boxes may look very similar, but the power and the capacity within those boxes is completely changed.”

Traffic engineers are going from having six different time cycles they can run to 64.

They’ll have improved video surveillance to keep a closer eye on congestion and change the lights accordingly.

It’s not uncommon to wait for two or even three cycles of traffic signals at some of Wilmington’s busiest intersections. After these improvements are done, you should be spending less time waiting at red lights.

“We’ll have coordination on say both independence and on shipyard, so it will facilitate traffic movement on both arteries as opposed to having to make a choice between this one or that one,” Bennett said.

Mayor Saffo says the project is on schedule and under budget.

The project costs ten million dollars, with the expense being split between the city of Wilmington and the state DOT. Three million comes from a transportation bond approved by voters in 2006.

The earliest drivers will see a difference with traffic signals, is in October.

Story image

traffic300.jpg

Story summary

videoIf you drive around Wilmington, you often find yourself waiting….and waiting….and waiting….at red lights. The city’s traffic lights are notoriously long, but that will soon change.

Story summary image

traffic150.jpg

Associated poll

More: continued here

Keeping Southport clean

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

Video

Body

The city of Southport is doing its part to stay beautiful. Wednesday was the first day of the annual fall clean-up.

Residents can drop off everything from old appliances to just general junk. Normally, these items would cost money to dump at the county landfill, but the fall clean up is free.

It helps people get rid of old stuff laying around the house and reduces code enforcement violations.

“We don’t want eyesores in town and we want to keep Southport clean and beautiful like it is, and just trying to get people to co-operate; it’s what we’re trying to do,” said Charles Shaw, a code enforcement officer.

“Oh, I think it’s a great idea. Because we’re doing this because its free this week. Otherwise it might sit there for another year,” said Gwen Tanner who was dumping some trash.

The dumpsters are located at Leonard Street and Willis Drive. They’ll only be there until Saturday at 1:00pm. Most items can be thrown out, but yard debris is not accepted.

Story image

sport300.jpg

Story summary

The city of Southport is doing its part to stay beautiful. Wednesday was the first day of the annual fall clean-up.

Story summary image

sport150.jpg

Associated poll

More: continued here

Dark Water: The Legacy of Hurricane Floyd, Part 3

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

Body

It is a cycle that Carolina residents know well. A storm forms, hits, dumps heavy rain, and moves on its way. Clean-up can be slow, but you get a chance to dry out. That was not the case with hurricane season 1999.

In late August/early September, Hurricane Dennis dumped up to 18 inches of rain in the Carolinas. Just a few weeks later, Floyd would bring over 19 inches. Keep in mind that a coastal location may only average about 55-60 inches of rain for an entire year. So when you dump nearly 40 inches in just under a month, you are going to flood, no matter how well the drainage system is designed. And southeastern North Carolina did flood.

There were 52 fatalities in North Carolina, many due to drowning. When people encounter flooded roadways, there first instinct is to try to drive through the water. After all, the water may not look that deep.

Think of it this way, it is a question of buoyancy. For each foot the water rises up the side of a vehicle, 1,500 pounds or water is displaced. In essence, you car weighs 1,500 pounds less for each foot of rising water. In other words, 2 feet of moving water will be more than enough to float away a car or light truck.

Also, remember that you can’t see the condition of the road underneath standing water. It may be damaged, or gone altogether. What seems to be only a few feet of water may turn out to be over 20 feet deep.

NOAA has started an excellent campaign called “Turn Around, Don’t Drown”, and the premise is simple. If you see standing water on a roadway, don’t go through it, it may cost you your life.

For more on Floyd, visit our special Remembering Hurricane Floyd section on our website.

Story image

dwater300.jpg

Story summary

videoAs we prepare for future hurricanes, we are looking back at one that caused major damage in southeastern North Carolina ten years ago. In our series, Dark Water, meteorologist Jerry Jackson has examined the effects of Hurricane Floyd.

Story summary image

dwater150.jpg

Associated poll

More: continued here

City Council puts foot down on storm water issue

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

Video

Body

The city of Wilmington is cracking down in the name of cleaner storm water. City Council voted Tuesday night to fine pet owners $250 if they do not pick up after their pet.

If left on the ground, the waste runs off in to our water. Pet owners say not only is it bad for the environment, but also the bottom of a shoe.

“I don’t like it, especially if I step in it,” said Charles Steel. “Once in a great while that happens, but I do think 18 or 19 out of 20 do clean up.”

City Council member and dog owner, Margaret Haynes said, “It’s an important issue because everybody has a responsibility to maintain our environmental resources and clean water is certainly one of them.”

Dog walkers will be required to carry good neighbor bags when the ordinance takes effect November 1st. A $250 fine will also be levied on folks who dump yard debris in storm drains.

Story image

petwaste300b.jpg

Story summary

The city of Wilmington is cracking down in the name of cleaner storm water. City Council voted Tuesday night to fine pet owners $250 if they do not pick up after their pet.

Story summary image

petwaste150a.jpg

Associated poll

More: continued here

 

Archives

News provided by WWAY NewsChannel 3 and the StarNewsOnline

|Home| |Events| |Attractions| |Accommodations| |Restaurants| |Golf| |Beaches| |Jobs| |Getting Here| |Climate| |Directory| |News| |Advertise| |Contact Us|

 
 
  Welcome to Wilmington, North Carolina