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Archive for December, 2009

Some NC college students say they were misled

Monday, December 28th, 2009

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MONTREAT, N.C. — Some teachers working on advanced degrees at a western North Carolina college say they were misled about student loans.

The Asheville Citizen-Times reported Monday about 50 teachers say recruiters for Montreat College told them they could have loans for a master’s degree forgiven by the federal government.

A sixth-grade teacher at Apple Valley Middle School in Henderson County, Lisa Rogers, says she later discovered only high school math and science teachers and special education teachers qualified
for the full $17,500 of loan forgiveness.

The newspaper reported the Montreat program was geared for teachers in grades K-6, but loan forgiveness only pays $5,000 for elementary instructors.

Montreat spokesman Michael Dechane says the school hopes to resolve the complaints next month.

Information from: The Asheville Citizen-Times,

(Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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Some teachers working on advanced degrees at a western North Carolina college say they were misled about student loans.

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Police say argument with ex-girlfriend may have led to Creekwood shooting

Monday, December 28th, 2009

Preliminary investigation of a woman shot Sunday in Creekwood indicates the victim and her ex-girlfriend were arguing on the side of Emery Street before the shooting, according to a new release from the Wilmington Police Department.

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Study: NC can save millions with no death penalty

Monday, December 28th, 2009

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RALEIGH, N.C. — A Duke University professor says North Carolina could save $11 million a year if it stopped trying to execute killers.

The News & Observer of Raleigh reported Monday that prosecutors sought the death penalty in about a quarter of all murder trials from 2005 to 2006. Criminals were sentenced to death in less than 5
percent of the cases.

Duke economist Philip Cook published the study this month and will present his findings to lawmakers. Cook says the rarity of death sentences in North Carolina means the penalty doesn’t deter criminals. About 1,000 criminals were charged with murder in North Carolina in 2005 and 2006 and prosecutors sought the death penalty in about 250 of the case. Only 11 people were eventually sentenced to death.

Information from: The News & Observer

(Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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A Duke University professor says North Carolina could save $11 million a year if it stopped trying to execute killers.

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Associated poll

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Atmosphere Academy: those clouds we see in the sky

Monday, December 28th, 2009

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When you look up at the sky, have you ever attempted to count the number of clouds you see? How about the cloud types? It’s a lot harder than you think. Class is in session at Pine Valley Elementary School.

Cloud identification is one of those topics that can get complicated rather quickly. To help us keep everything straight, meteorologists often divide clouds into 3 broad categories: high clouds, middle clouds, and lows clouds.

For high clouds, the base of the cloud usually forms between 16,000 ft and 50,000 feet. These clouds are often thin or wispy in appearance and they usually indicate quiet weather in the short-term. Types of high clouds include cirrus, cirrostratus, and cirrocumulus.

For middle clouds, the base of the cloud forms between 6,000 feet and 23,000 feet. These clouds can vary widely in appearance, from flat/uniform shapes to “cotton candy” texture. Types of middle clouds include altostratus and altocumulus.

Low clouds have a base that forms at 6,500 feet or less. These clouds also can come in a variety of shapes and sizes, ranging from bright cotton ball appearance to dark, continuous layers. Types of low clouds include stratus, cumulus, and cumulonimbus.

By the way, the addition of nimbo or nimbus to a cloud name indicates that the cloud is producing rain.

Of course, there are cloud types that fall outside the traditional 3 tier identification system. These formations are specific to certain types of weather. For example, “wall clouds” represent the lowering of the rain-free base of a thunderstorm, and often signal tornado formation. A “shelf cloud” represents the leading edge of strong winds in advance of a thunderstorm.
As you can see, the list of cloud formation seems endless; just one more reason meteorologists always have to stay on top of things.

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When you look up at the sky, have you ever attempted to count the number of clouds you see? How about the cloud types? It’s a lot harder than you think. Class is in session at Pine Valley Elementary School.

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Associated poll

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Solomon Towers evacuated after mattress catches fire

Monday, December 28th, 2009

Wilmington firefighters had a scare early this morning at Solomon Towers when a ninth-floor resident’s mattress caught on fire. The resident was able to extinguish the fire with water and no damage was recorded, Capt. Mark Williamson of the Wilmington Fire Department said.

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